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Does Every Spring Really Bring the Worst Pollen Season Ever?

Santa Monica, CA-

It’s deja vu all over again as you turn on the evening news and hear, “It’s the worst pollen season ever!” You think, “Haven’t I heard this before?” But what you really want to know is how the pollen season will affect your allergy symptoms, and what you can do to ease your suffering.

 

“Unfortunately, it’s true that in the past few years, the amount of pollen in the air during spring allergy season seems to have gotten worse,” says allergist Dr. Bernard Geller, Allergy & Clinical Immunology Medical Group. “One of the reasons is the effects of climate change. Increased carbon dioxide from longer growing seasons as a result of warmer weather has a positive effect on pollen production. That means a negative effect on those suffering from pollen allergens.”

 

Must another “worst pollen season ever” leave you helpless in the face of increased allergy triggers? No. Following are 4 tips from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology on coping with pollen and other allergens that arrive with warmer weather.

 

Don’t self-medicate – You may think “I got this covered” when it comes to treating symptoms, but a recent study shows most allergy sufferers find prescription medication more effective than over-the-counter cures. Yet most people don’t seek the help of an allergist who is trained to identify exactly what they are allergic to, and prescribe the most appropriate medication to treat their symptoms.

 

Get ahead of symptoms – A fact many allergy sufferers may not be aware of is that if you start taking your allergy medications before the worst symptoms hit, your suffering will be greatly alleviated. Although people think spring starts in April or May, spring allergy symptoms begin earlier, so start taking your prescription allergy medications two to three weeks before your symptoms normally appear.

 

Most effective – and natural – treatment for allergies – Many people in search of “natural” allergy treatments don’t realize that immunotherapy – allergy shots – are actually the most natural treatment of all. Immunotherapy involves giving gradually increasing doses of the substances you’re allergic to. The incremental increases of the allergens cause the immune system to become less sensitive, which reduces allergy symptoms in the future. Immunotherapy is also effective in treating allergic asthma. Allergy shots help relieve the allergic reactions that trigger asthma episodes and decrease the need for asthma medications.

 

Easy is good – While you’re battling those terrible allergens, keep in mind that you can affect change at home.

 

Dora Afrahim, MPAP, PA-C

Allergy & Clinical Immunology Medical Group

For more information about treatment of allergies and asthma, visit our website at www.SneezeWheeze.com, or reach us by telephone: (310)828-8534 or by e-mail: FrontOffice@allergyandclinical.com

Author
Dora Afrahim, PA-C Dora Afrahim is a board-certified Physician Assistant. She received her Bachelor's degree from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and then received her Master's degree from Keck School of Medicine USC. Her training includes general medicine as well as diagnosing and developing individualized treatment plans for patients who suffer from allergies, asthma, and other disorders of the immune system. Dora is a Southern California native and was inspired to specialize in Allergy & Immunology by her desire to help improve her patient’s quality of life. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling, hiking, traveling and volunteering.

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