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Flu Season in 2020-2021

Santa Monica, CA-
 
In the United States, flu season occurs in the fall and winter. While influenza viruses circulate year-round, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February. Therefore, Dr. Bernard Geller & physician assistant, Dora Afrahim recommend getting getting the flu vaccine in September and October. Since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against flu, it's recomended make plans to get vaccinated before flu season begins. CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October. 

 

Who should get vaccinated this season?

Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season with rare exceptions. Vaccination is particularly important for people who are at high risk of serious complications from influenza. If you are at high risk of developing serious flu complications, vaccination is especially important. This includes all of our asthma and elderly patients above 65 years of age. When you get vaccinated, you reduce your risk of getting sick with flu and possibly being hospitalized or dying from flu. This season, getting a flu vaccine has the added benefit of reducing the overall burden on the health care system and saving medical resources for care of COVID-19 patients.

 

Special Consideration Regarding Egg Allergy

People with egg allergies can receive any licensed, recommended age-appropriate influenza vaccine (IIV, RIV4, or LAIV4) that is otherwise appropriate.  People who have a history of severe egg allergy (those who have had any symptom other than hives after exposure to egg) should be vaccinated in a medical setting, supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic reactions. Two completely egg-free (ovalbumin-free) flu vaccine options are available: quadrivalent recombinant vaccine and quadrivalent cell-based vaccine.

 

If you are concerned about allergic reactions and flu vaccination, please feel free to book a consultation with one of our medical providers to help decide whether vaccination is right for you . 

For more information about helping your child with allergies and asthma stay safe, visit our website at www.SneezeWheeze.com, or reach us by telephone: (310)828-8534 or by e-mail: FrontOffice@allergyandclinical.com

Dora Afrahim, MPAP, PA-C

Allergy & Clinical Immunology Medical Group

Author
Dora Afrahim, PA-C Dora Afrahim is a board-certified Physician Assistant. She received her Bachelor's degree from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and then received her Master's degree from Keck School of Medicine USC. Her training includes general medicine as well as diagnosing and developing individualized treatment plans for patients who suffer from allergies, asthma, and other disorders of the immune system. Dora is a Southern California native and was inspired to specialize in Allergy & Immunology by her desire to help improve her patient’s quality of life. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling, hiking, traveling and volunteering.

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